The Overstated Stripes Challenge

Design challenge week six. The surface pattern marketplace now sends out a weekly design challenge to all creative designers, and illustrators that have joined their marketplace. By offering a weekly design challenge, it is a great way to really test their skills and creativity. By accepting the challenge they then have to create one or two designs in their hand, giving their own interpretation.

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design
Winning Design by
Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

The Stripe Pattern

Each week the surface pattern marketplace chooses a topic that is relevant or has recently been in the fashion or home interiors blogs or trend news.

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Winning Design by
Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

Overstated Stripes Design

This week they decided the challenge on a recent New York Fashion Week show, exhibiting some amazing Overstated striped patterns for women’s and Men’s wear 2020 from the top fashion designers and featured in Vogue Runway trends.

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Winning Design by
Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

The Stripe

Stripes in the Twentieth Century

Stripes on garments first appeared in the Medieval times. During that era, only prisoners, criminals, clowns, prostitutes, hangmen, etc. were seen wearing a black and white striped garment. However, by the end of the nineteenth century, a new definition of stripes was created by Queen Victoria. The queen dressed her son in a sailor suit during a Royal Yacht boarding event[3]. Stripes were no longer just associated with “someone evil.” Stripes were then connected with words such as “marine” and “sea”. Navy blue and white stripes were adopted by swimmers on their bathing suits. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the stripe fashion became mainstream again. Coco Chanel was inspired by the workers’ uniform during her trip to the French Rivera, and she started to apply the “Navy and White Stripes” into her designs[4]. In the ’50s, movie stars were seen wearing striped shirts through the media. During the ’60s and ’70s, more and more people started to wear striped shirts as the garment was seen as a symbol of rebellion. The Stripe- Wikipedia

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Winning Design by
Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

The Stripe Challenge

This weeks challenge the designers were asked to design one or two patterns using the brief of Overstated Stripes trend for women’s apparel S/S 2020. This weeks response has again been fabulous, and the designers have really used their creativity having producing some exceptional quality work. Our aim for this weekly challenge was to create a brief that was both challenging and fun at the same time.

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Winning Design by
Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

The Winner

The winner is Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design .

Sue is a Surface Pattern Designer based in the Central Highlands, north east of Melbourne, Australia. She has a long history in the Arts, starting with a BA in Fine Arts, followed by a Adv.Cert in Illustration, and rounded off with a Cert IV Graphic Design. Sue currently licenses and sells her designs internationally, running her own online Boutique, and an award winning exhibiting artist. She sees patterns everywhere she looks, and with this love and passion for design it comes through in all aspects of her work. Sue loves to draw and paint by hand, and digitally and also to combine all parts of her knowledge to create what she calls ‘modern mixed media’.

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Second Design ‘Stripes & Flowers’ for the challenge:
By Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

Sue has produced an amazing design, using all the colours given in the brief, and produced a great statement pattern suitable for women’s or Men’s wear 2020 Season. The design shows bold elements of a stripe pattern and mixed with floral striped geometric elements that mix together in harmony, and the colours really work together to create a great statement piece that not only could be used on apparel, but could be quite easily seen on a wall as a piece of art. The design looks just as good on a top, for women’s wear, but also works just as well on men’s trousers. To view more of Sues designs for license. Please click Here – SHS Creative Collection

Winning Design by  
Sue Schreiber  - SSH Creative Design

Second Design ‘Stripes & Flowers’ for the challenge:
By Sue Schreiber – SSH Creative Design

Join Our Challenge

You will need to have an account with us first, click on start selling button on the homepage, complete our registration form, – and then send us 5 JPG images of your most recent work, your CV, and a brief intro as to why you would like to join the fastest growing surface pattern and textile marketplace in the World.

The History of the stripe

Latest Stripe Designs